Dear Friends,
We had a remarkable mid-summer effort this past Sat., 7/22, on an extension of the Cochituate Aqueduct Trail (CAT). Several new volunteers joined a few veterans and we cleared a lovely extension of the CAT behind the East Natick Industrial Park (and sadly quite a lot of litter at each end). But now it’s all cleaned up thanks to the hard work of nearly a dozen intrepid volunteers. Join us this fall (Sat., Oct 21 — Our 7th Annual Natick Trails Day) when we hope to “punch” it all the way across the edge of the Sunkaway (wetland) to Weathersfield (Bradford Road). You’ll have a great time and learn more about our glorious Natick Trails.
Many people to thank:
• Neil Rhein (Executive Director of Keep Massachusetts Beautiful) who helped us in the critical stages of forming our affiliate and non-profit status, and at the same time providing key advice in applying for the Grant).
• Grace Keegan and Keep America Beautiful who awarded us a generous Community Trails Grant for wonderful and essential new tools.
• Our dear friend, Nick Jenkins (Dunkin Donuts Corporate) who always gives generously (coffee, hot chocolate, donuts, bagels, etc.)
• I’d also like to thank my wife, Jane, and sister, Sally, for delivering the donation from Dunkin Donuts and setting up our tables. –Pat
Keep Natick Beautiful, Inc.
(a 501 (c) (3) non-profit corporation)
formerly known as:
Big Heart Little Feet
Pat Conaway – (President – Founder)
11 Pumpkin Pine Road
Natick, Massachusetts 01760
508-740-9949
Email: bpconaway@gmail.com visit on the web: (keepnatickbeautiful.org)
and (keepmassbeautiful.org)

Beautification

Beauty Is Good For Business!

At Keep Natick Beautiful, we believe it’s important for cities, towns, neighborhoods and businesses to pay close attention to their “curb appeal.” This includes things such as tree-lined streets, well maintained public plazas, attractive landscaping, and other factors.

Studies have demonstrated that “curb appeal” can have a direct impact on the success of a business. Think about it. When you’re looking to grab a bite to eat, you look around and think, “that looks like a nice place to eat.” Conversely, if a restaurant’s facade is weather-beaten and its property is littered with trash, you may decide to take your business elsewhere. When you’re looking to rent an apartment or buy a home, proximity to a vibrant downtown shopping and dining district is often a critical consideration.
Sprucing up public spaces, such as downtown sidewalks, plazas, parks, and medians makes people want to visit these places. That not only builds community pride, but also helps attract shoppers, enhances property values, and generates tax revenues. Think about the millions of dollars tourists spend when they visit Washington D.C. each spring to view the cherry blossoms.
These beautification efforts are often the result of public-private partnerships. Local businesses may provide funding, while local garden clubs may volunteer to maintain public gardens. Below are resources and programs to help communities beautify their public spaces:
Adopt-a-Spot: This program provides local landscapers, business owners, and residents the opportunity to beautify highly visible areas around town. Adopters create flowerbeds, plant flowers and shrubs, and maintain their public sites throughout the growing season. Some communities will reward participants with a small sign to acknowledge their help. Learn more.
 
Trash Can Be Beautiful: This program transforms ordinary municipal trash barrels into works of art. It provides an opportunity for volunteers to put their own creative stamp on a public trash barrel, while helping to reduce litter. Learn more.
 
National Planting Day:  Keep America Beautiful, its affiliates and its partners are mobilizing Americans to plant native species of trees, flowers, and plants in their communities. Native species restore ecological balance to the environment while creating greener, more beautiful communities. Learn more.
At Keep Natick Beautiful, we believe it’s important for cities, towns, neighborhoods and businesses to pay close attention to their “curb appeal.” This includes things such as tree-lined streets, well maintained public plazas, attractive landscaping, and other factors. Studies have demonstrated that “curb appeal” can have a direct impact on the success of a business. Think about it. When you’re looking to grab a bite to eat, you look around and think, “that looks like a nice place to eat.” Conversely, if a restaurant’s facade is weather-beaten and its property is littered with trash, you may decide to take your business elsewhere. When you’re looking to rent an apartment or buy a home, proximity to a vibrant downtown shopping and dining district is often a critical consideration. Sprucing up public spaces, such as downtown sidewalks, plazas, parks, and medians makes people want to visit these places. That not only builds community pride, but also helps attract shoppers, enhances property values, and generates tax revenues. Think about the millions of dollars tourists spend when they visit Washington D.C. each spring to view the cherry blossoms. These beautification efforts are often the result of public-private partnerships. Local businesses may provide funding, while local garden clubs may volunteer to maintain public gardens. Below are resources and programs to help communities beautify their public spaces: Adopt-a-Spot: This program provides local landscapers, business owners, and residents the opportunity to beautify highly visible areas around town. Adopters create flowerbeds, plant flowers and shrubs, and maintain their public sites throughout the growing season. Some communities will reward participants with a small sign to acknowledge their help. Learn more. Trash Can Be Beautiful: This program transforms ordinary municipal trash barrels into works of art. It provides an opportunity for volunteers to put their own creative stamp on a public trash barrel, while helping to reduce litter. Learn more. National Planting Day: Keep America Beautiful, its affiliates and its partners are mobilizing Americans to plant native species of trees, flowers, and plants in their communities. Native species restore ecological balance to the environment while creating greener, more beautiful communities. Learn more.